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e61 Seminar Series: Keep Me In, Coach: The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Targeted Academic Coaching

19 January @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm AEDT

Virtual Event Virtual Event
Free

Presenter: Stefanie Fischer

Authors: Serena Canaan, Stefanie Fischer, Pierre Mouganie, Geoffrey C. Schnorr

Time & Location

19 Jan 2023, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm AEDT
Macquarie Uni City Campus, Level 24/123 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia | Online

About the event

To boost college graduation rates, policymakers often advocate for academic supports such as coaching or mentoring. Proactive and intensive coaching interventions are effective, but are costly and difficult to scale. We evaluate a relatively lower-cost group coaching program targeted at first-year college students placed on academic probation.

Participants attend a workshop where coaches aim to normalize failure and improve self-confidence. Coaches also facilitate a process whereby participants reflect on their academic difficulties, devise solutions to address their challenges, and create an action plan. Participants then hold a one-time follow-up meeting with their coach or visit a campus resource. Using a difference-in-discontinuity design, we show that the program raises students’ first-year GPA by 14.6% of a standard deviation, and decreases the probability of first-year dropout by 8.5 percentage points. Effects are concentrated among lower-income students who also experience a significant increase in the probability of graduating. Finally, using administrative data we provide the first evidence that coaching/mentoring may have substantial long-run effects as we document significant gains in lower-income students’ earnings 7–9 years following entry to the university. Our findings indicate that targeted, group coaching can be an effective way to improve marginal students’ academic and early career outcomes.

Details

Date:
19 January
Time:
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm AEDT
Cost:
Free

Venue

Macquarie Uni City Campus
Level 24/123 Pitt St
Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia

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e61 Seminar Series: Keep Me In, Coach: The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Targeted Academic Coaching


Macquarie Uni City Campus Level 24/123 Pitt St, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia
Loading Events

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  • This event has passed.

e61 Seminar Series: Keep Me In, Coach: The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Targeted Academic Coaching

19 January @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm AEDT

Virtual Event Virtual Event
Free

Presenter: Stefanie Fischer

Authors: Serena Canaan, Stefanie Fischer, Pierre Mouganie, Geoffrey C. Schnorr

Time & Location

19 Jan 2023, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm AEDT
Macquarie Uni City Campus, Level 24/123 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia | Online

About the event

To boost college graduation rates, policymakers often advocate for academic supports such as coaching or mentoring. Proactive and intensive coaching interventions are effective, but are costly and difficult to scale. We evaluate a relatively lower-cost group coaching program targeted at first-year college students placed on academic probation.

Participants attend a workshop where coaches aim to normalize failure and improve self-confidence. Coaches also facilitate a process whereby participants reflect on their academic difficulties, devise solutions to address their challenges, and create an action plan. Participants then hold a one-time follow-up meeting with their coach or visit a campus resource. Using a difference-in-discontinuity design, we show that the program raises students’ first-year GPA by 14.6% of a standard deviation, and decreases the probability of first-year dropout by 8.5 percentage points. Effects are concentrated among lower-income students who also experience a significant increase in the probability of graduating. Finally, using administrative data we provide the first evidence that coaching/mentoring may have substantial long-run effects as we document significant gains in lower-income students’ earnings 7–9 years following entry to the university. Our findings indicate that targeted, group coaching can be an effective way to improve marginal students’ academic and early career outcomes.

Details

Date:
19 January
Time:
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm AEDT
Cost:
Free

Venue

Macquarie Uni City Campus
Level 24/123 Pitt St
Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia

Presenter: Stefanie Fischer

Authors: Serena Canaan, Stefanie Fischer, Pierre Mouganie, Geoffrey C. Schnorr

Time & Location

19 Jan 2023, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm AEDT
Macquarie Uni City Campus, Level 24/123 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia | Online

About the event

To boost college graduation rates, policymakers often advocate for academic supports such as coaching or mentoring. Proactive and intensive coaching interventions are effective, but are costly and difficult to scale. We evaluate a relatively lower-cost group coaching program targeted at first-year college students placed on academic probation.

Participants attend a workshop where coaches aim to normalize failure and improve self-confidence. Coaches also facilitate a process whereby participants reflect on their academic difficulties, devise solutions to address their challenges, and create an action plan. Participants then hold a one-time follow-up meeting with their coach or visit a campus resource. Using a difference-in-discontinuity design, we show that the program raises students’ first-year GPA by 14.6% of a standard deviation, and decreases the probability of first-year dropout by 8.5 percentage points. Effects are concentrated among lower-income students who also experience a significant increase in the probability of graduating. Finally, using administrative data we provide the first evidence that coaching/mentoring may have substantial long-run effects as we document significant gains in lower-income students’ earnings 7–9 years following entry to the university. Our findings indicate that targeted, group coaching can be an effective way to improve marginal students’ academic and early career outcomes.

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e61/Macquarie University Seminar Series with Peter Ganong | Wealth, Race, and Consumption Smoothing of Typical Income Shocks

14 February @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm AEDT

Virtual Event Virtual Event
Free

Presenter: Peter Ganong

Authors: Peter Ganong, University of Chicago and NBER  Damon Jones, University of Chicago and NBER  Pascal Noel, University of Chicago Diana Farrell, JPMorgan Chase Institute Fiona Greig, JPMorgan Chase Institute Chris Wheat, JPMorgan Chase Institute

Time & Location

14 Feb 2023, 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm AEDT
e61 Office, Level 3/ 17-21 Bellevue Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010, Australia | Online

About the event

We study the consumption response to typical labor income shocks and investigate how these vary by wealth and race. First, we estimate the elasticity of consumption with respect to income using an instrument based on firm-wide changes in monthly pay. While much of the consumption-smoothing literature uses variation in unusual windfall income, this instrument captures the temporary income variation that households typically experience. In addition, because it can be constructed for every worker in every month, it allows for more precision than most previous estimates. We implement this approach in administrative bank account data and find an average elasticity of 0.23, with a standard error of 0.01. This increased precision also allows us to address an open question about the extent of heterogeneity by wealth in the elasticity. We find a much lower consumption response for high-liquidity households, which may help discipline structural consumption models. Second, we use this instrument to study how wealth shapes racial inequality. An extensive body of work documents a substantial racial and ethnic wealth gap. However, less is known about how this gap translates into differences in welfare on a month-to-month basis. We combine our instrument for typical income volatility with a new dataset linking bank account data with race and Hispanicity. We find that black (Hispanic) households cut their consumption 50 (20) percent more than white households when faced with a similarly-sized income shock. Nearly all of this differential pass-through of income to consumption is explained in a statistical sense by differences in liquid wealth. Combining our empirical estimates with a model, we show that temporary income volatility has a substantial welfare cost for all groups. Because of racial disparities in consumption smoothing, the cost is at least 50 percent higher for black households and 20 percent higher for Hispanic households than it is for white households.

Details

Date:
14 February
Time:
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm AEDT
Cost:
Free

Venue

e61 Institute
Level 3/17-21 Bellevue Street
Surry Hills, NSW 2010 Australia
View Venue Website

RSVP

3 Going
RSVP Here
Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

e61/Macquarie University Seminar Series with Peter Ganong | Wealth, Race, and Consumption Smoothing of Typical Income Shocks

14 February @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm AEDT

Virtual Event Virtual Event
Free

Presenter: Peter Ganong

Authors: Peter Ganong, University of Chicago and NBER  Damon Jones, University of Chicago and NBER  Pascal Noel, University of Chicago Diana Farrell, JPMorgan Chase Institute Fiona Greig, JPMorgan Chase Institute Chris Wheat, JPMorgan Chase Institute

Time & Location

14 Feb 2023, 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm AEDT
e61 Office, Level 3/ 17-21 Bellevue Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010, Australia | Online

About the event

We study the consumption response to typical labor income shocks and investigate how these vary by wealth and race. First, we estimate the elasticity of consumption with respect to income using an instrument based on firm-wide changes in monthly pay. While much of the consumption-smoothing literature uses variation in unusual windfall income, this instrument captures the temporary income variation that households typically experience. In addition, because it can be constructed for every worker in every month, it allows for more precision than most previous estimates. We implement this approach in administrative bank account data and find an average elasticity of 0.23, with a standard error of 0.01. This increased precision also allows us to address an open question about the extent of heterogeneity by wealth in the elasticity. We find a much lower consumption response for high-liquidity households, which may help discipline structural consumption models. Second, we use this instrument to study how wealth shapes racial inequality. An extensive body of work documents a substantial racial and ethnic wealth gap. However, less is known about how this gap translates into differences in welfare on a month-to-month basis. We combine our instrument for typical income volatility with a new dataset linking bank account data with race and Hispanicity. We find that black (Hispanic) households cut their consumption 50 (20) percent more than white households when faced with a similarly-sized income shock. Nearly all of this differential pass-through of income to consumption is explained in a statistical sense by differences in liquid wealth. Combining our empirical estimates with a model, we show that temporary income volatility has a substantial welfare cost for all groups. Because of racial disparities in consumption smoothing, the cost is at least 50 percent higher for black households and 20 percent higher for Hispanic households than it is for white households.

Details

Date:
14 February
Time:
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm AEDT
Cost:
Free

Venue

e61 Institute
Level 3/17-21 Bellevue Street
Surry Hills, NSW 2010 Australia
View Venue Website

RSVP

3 Going
RSVP Here